Ask A Genius 290 – Innovations in the Future

In-Sight Publishing

Ask A Genius 290 – Innovations in the Future

September 14, 2017

[Beginning of recorded material]

Scott Douglas Jacobsen: What about innovations in the future?

Rick Rosner: I have not been doing a lot of thinking about this, I’ve kind of blindly accepted that future innovation will be done by the automated people are working in combination with AI or by AI itself. The most steps forward, you know, beginning ten, twenty, thirty years from now are going to be in serious combination with AI or by AI on its own. But thinking further about it, and having…having been in the art model off and on, since I was twenty-four so more than thirty years I have been working a bunch of places including the art, you know, you get good art for the most work done from places that are art schools, like Art Centre Pasadena or Cal Art or SVA New York or the New York (inaudible) and if the art is done by none art students at none art colleges like the University of Colorado in New Mexico, you know, schools that don’t specialize in art, that’s a much lower level of skills and artistic insight so, I can imagine that, you know, what innovation isn’t done in AI for humans the concerns with AI’s will be kind of that level kind of, you know, make human innovation looks kind of crappier in relative to what the powerful technology can do so, there will be, though crappier often, it can be fun. So, you’ve got, you’ll have…innovation will have several flavours, probably many more flavours than that, but off the top of my head there will be pure AI innovations which, you know, takes a while to come. Because AI is helpless at this point without being human directed. You will have AI that real innovations being done by augmented humans, you will have innovations by defiant human craft people, people who don’t like the coming status quo of everything being mediated through AI and who have diligently determined or developed the practice their craft to be able to continue with the human arts of creation without resorting to AI. This is a kind of what my buddy Lance, a Sculpture and Painter does, he sticks to old forms, the ancient Greek sculptural methods, renaissance painting methods and I tell Lance…at least he paints paternal themes, you  know, deep metaphysical themes and, you know, like Lance, he just paints like modern people (inaudible) modern way, like people talking on their cell phones in cars or they are texting while driving, and he refuses to give in to modernity and so, you will have some innovation, some creativity coming from defiant defenders of human craft and art, and then you will have the casual, you know, creators of ridiculousness of t-shirt themes and memes done by, you know, regular people joking around, so that’s it.

The most steps forward, you know, beginning ten, twenty, thirty years from now are going to be in serious combination with AI or by AI on its own. But thinking further about it, and having…having been in the art model off and on, since I was twenty-four so more than thirty years I have been working a bunch of places including the art, you know, you get good art for the most work done from places that are art schools, like Art Centre Pasadena or Cal Art or SVA New York or the New York (inaudible) and if the art is done by none art students at none art colleges like the University of Colorado in New Mexico, you know, schools that don’t specialize in art, that’s a much lower level of skills and artistic insight so, I can imagine that , you know, what innovation isn’t done in AI for humans the concerns with AI’s will be kind of that level kind of, you know, make human innovation looks kind of crappier in relative to what the powerful technology can do so, there will be, though crappier often, it can be fun. So, you’ve got, you’ll have…innovation will have several flavors, probably many more flavors than that, but off the top of my head, there will be pure AI innovations which, you know, takes a while to come. Because AI is helpless at this point without being human-directed. You will have AI that real innovations being done by augmented humans, you will have innovations by defiant human craft people, people who don’t like the coming status quo of everything being mediated through AI and who have diligently determined or developed the practice their craft to be able to continue with the human arts of creation without resorting to AI. This is a kind of what my buddy Lance, a Sculpture and Painter does, he sticks to old forms, the ancient Greek sculptural methods, renaissance painting methods and I tell Lance…at least he paints paternal themes, you  know, deep metaphysical themes and, you know, like Lance, he just paints like modern people (inaudible) modern way, like people talking on their cell phones in cars or they are texting while driving, and he refuses to give in to modernity and so, you will have some innovation, some creativity coming from defiant defenders of human craft and art, and then you will have the casual, you know, creators of ridiculousness of t-shirt themes and memes done by, you know, regular people joking around, so that’s it.

[End of recorded material]

Authors[1]

Rick Rosner

American Television Writer

RickRosner@Hotmail.Com

Rick Rosner

Scott Douglas Jacobsen

Editor-in-Chief, In-Sight Publishing

Scott.D.Jacobsen@Gmail.Com

In-Sight Publishing

Footnotes

[1] Four format points for the session article:

  1. Bold text following “Scott Douglas Jacobsen:” or “Jacobsen:” is Scott Douglas Jacobsen & non-bold text following “Rick Rosner:” or “Rosner:” is Rick Rosner.
  2. Session article conducted, transcribed, edited, formatted, and published by Scott.
  3. Footnotes & in-text citations in the interview & references after the interview.
  4. This session article has been edited for clarity and readability.

For further information on the formatting guidelines incorporated into this document, please see the following documents:

  1. American Psychological Association. (2010). Citation Guide: APA. Retrieved from http://www.lib.sfu.ca/system/files/28281/APA6CitationGuideSFUv3.pdf.
  2. Humble, A. (n.d.). Guide to Transcribing. Retrieved from http://www.msvu.ca/site/media/msvu/Transcription%20Guide.pdf.

License and Copyright

License
In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal by Scott Douglas Jacobsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at www.in-sightjournal.com and www.rickrosner.org.

Copyright

© Scott Douglas Jacobsen, Rick Rosner, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal 2012-2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Scott Douglas Jacobsen, Rick Rosner, and In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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